Rights Respecting

Top Ten Rights!

Each class chose twelve articles that they thought were most important, then the Ambassadors used these to decide on the school's Top Ten which you can see below.

Top Ten Rights

Article 2:

Everyone has rights, whatever race, religion or ability or type of family they come from.

Article 7:

Every child has a right to a name and nationality as well as the right to be cared for by their parents/carers.

Article 12:

Every child has the right to have a say in all matters affecting them and to have their views taken seriously.

Article 13:

Every child must be free to say what they think and to seek and receive information as long as it is within the law.

Article 15:

Every child has the right to meet with other children and to join groups and organisations, as long as this does not stop other people from enjoying their rights.

Article 17:

Every child has the right to reliable information from the media.

Article 24:

Every child has the right to the best possible health.

Article 28:

Every child has the right to an education. Discipline in schools must respect children’s dignity.

Article 29:

Education must develop every child’s personality, talents and abilities to the full.  It must encourage respect for parents, cultures and the environment.

Article 31:

Every child has the right to relax, play and take part in a wide range of cultural and artistic activities.

PALS

PALS is an acronym standing for Pupils at Andrews Lane Speak.

Each week children from Years 1 to 6 meet in small, mixed age groups. In these meetings children read to each other and talk to each other about their week. This time allows the children to form relationships across the school with children they may not encounter in their usual school day.

"I like PALS reading time because I like reading to different children and visiting different classrooms

Grace, Year 1

"PALS is fun because you get to socialise with lots of children who you might not see or talk to usually"

Dolly-Jane, Year 5

"In PALS you get to  help the younger children to learn new words and improve their reading, its really fun!"

Jacob, Year 4

 

 Class Charters

Every class has created their own Class Charter around the Rights the children are entitled to.

Top Ten Rights!

Each class chose twelve articles that they thought were most important, then the Ambassadors used these to decide on the school's Top Ten which you can see below.

Top Ten Rights

Article 2:

Everyone has rights, whatever race, religion or ability or type of family they come from.

Article 7:

Every child has a right to a name and nationality as well as the right to be cared for by their parents/carers.

Article 12:

Every child has the right to have a say in all matters affecting them and to have their views taken seriously.

Article 13:

Every child must be free to say what they think and to seek and receive information as long as it is within the law.

Article 15:

Every child has the right to meet with other children and to join groups and organisations, as long as this does not stop other people from enjoying their rights.

Article 17:

Every child has the right to reliable information from the media.

Article 24:

Every child has the right to the best possible health.

Article 28:

Every child has the right to an education. Discipline in schools must respect children’s dignity.

Article 29:

Education must develop every child’s personality, talents and abilities to the full.  It must encourage respect for parents, cultures and the environment.

Article 31:

Every child has the right to relax, play and take part in a wide range of cultural and artistic activities.

 

 

Andrews Lane Rights Respecting Ambassadors

Every class voted for ambassadors to represent them so they could have their views heard and influence school decisions.

The successful candidates can be seen below.......

 

What is a Rights Respecting School?

At Andrews Lane, we have achieved recognition of commitment and are working towards level one of UNICEF Rights Respecting Schools Award. UNICEF (United Nations Children’s Fund) is the organisation working specifically for children and their rights. Its mission is to campaign for the protection of children’s rights in order to meet children’s basic needs and empower them to realise their full potential.

 

UNICEF UK believes that these values should be embedded in the ethos and curriculum of our schools, and provides a framework in order to accomplish this. This is the purpose of the RRSA (Rights Respecting School Award). In a rights respecting school, children learn about their rights and responsibilities. Children learn to associate rights with needs and distinguish between their rights and ‘wants’. They learn that if they have rights, they need to respect the rights of others.

 

Why are children learning about their rights at school?

In signing the UNCRC all Governments have a responsibility to make both children and adults aware of these rights. There are 42 rights of a child (articles) in the convention covering things such as; children having the right to education (article 27) and children have the right to be protected at all times (article 19).

 

What is meant by ‘rights’?

These are not the same as ‘wants’. Rights are the basic human needs and values that apply or should apply to everyone.

 

 What about children's respect for the rights of others?

Research has shown that when children are taught in school about their rights and responsibilities under the UNCRC, they are more respecting of the rights of others. Children who have learnt about their rights and responsibilties have :

a better understanding of what it means to have rights and responsibilities

a more positive attitude to school

better relationships with their classmates and teachers

higher self-esteem

an increased awareness of how to be a global citizen

 

How can parents support their child to learn about the Convention at home?

Take the time to ask your child what he/she has learnt recently regarding children’s rights and responsibilities.

Discuss the ideas learned in class, and try to think of examples from your own experiences, or from the media, of rights being respected or denied.

Discuss how your child or your family can promote respect for rights, or help those whose rights have been violated.

Model using rights and responsibility language with your children.

Ask your child’s opinion on children’s rights.

Each class has two rights respecting representatives who meet regularly to discuss the articles the school will focus on and how we can put these into action.

We also have a golden tree where children are nominated on golden stars and we are now introducing Golden Superstars who go above and beyond to show respect to others.